Mickey copyright has finally expired, and the original version will be eligible from January 1, 2024

Mickey Mouse’s copyright

On January 1, 2024, the original versions of two of the most popular characters in film and television, Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse, will enter the public domain. This will give creators the freedom to create all kinds of new projects with these characters. That could lead to movies and books like “Pooh Bear” and “Pride and Prejudice and Zombies” based on other popular characters whose copyrights have expired. Mickey copyright has finally expired, and the original version will be eligible from January 1, 2024.

Entry of silent film Steamboat Willie

The silent film Steamboat Willie (released in 1928, directed by Walt Disney and Ub Iwerks) will enter the public domain on January 1, 2024, and with it, the original versions of Minnie Mouse and Mickey Mouse will also become public domain. .

Mickey copyright has finally expired, and the original version will be eligible from January 1, 2024

This is the first time that the copyright on the original version of the character has expired, allowing it to be freely used by cartoonists, filmmakers, writers and others. This is a milestone for creators, who have long been limited by Disney’s lawsuits to stop copyright infringement.

Mickey copyright Strategy: Balancing Public Domain and Corporate Interests

However, the copyright remains on later versions of Mickey and Minnie, which subsequently appeared in numerous Disney movies and television shows. Disney told The Associated Press that Mickey “will continue to play a leading role as a global ambassador for The Walt Disney Company.”

Mickey copyright has finally expired, and the original version will be eligible from January 1, 2024

Other works that will enter the public domain in 2024 include DH Lawrence’s Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Virginia Woolf’s Orlando, Agatha Christie’s The Secret of the Blue Train, and The Bear, where Tigger first appears. There are sequels to the “Winnie the Pooh” series, including “The House in Pooh Alley.”

Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes works become public domain

In recent years, we’ve seen a lot of work including the original Winnie the Pooh, The Great Gatsby, Metropolis, The Lodger (Alfred Hitchcock’s first thriller), and Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes final. Some of his works have become public domain.

Mickey copyright has finally expired, and the original version will be eligible from January 1, 2024
Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes works become public domain

As a result of these copyright expirations, movies such as Winnie the Pooh ( a horror film starring a lovable bear with a sequel in the works) and Netflix’s Enola Holmes Projects include “Pride and Prejudice and Zombies,” the first in a series that parodies classics by Jane Austen, Ben H. Winters, and Cooke Coleridge.” (in which Holmes’ sister plays an active role) It became so.

Mickey and Minnie join other Disney characters

Mickey and Minnie join other Disney characters whose copyrights have expired and entered the public domain, including Peter Pan, Bambi, the Little Mermaid, Snow White, and Cinderella. These characters originally appeared in classic works by authors such as the Brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Andersen before Disney reinterpreted them in film.

Mickey and Minnie join other Disney characters

Once the copyright term expires, the characters can be used fairly in all kinds of new works, including books, movies, and music. “It seems like the trend is, ‘Just add zombies,'” Jennifer Jenkins of Duke University’s Center for Public Domain Research told entertainment industry magazine Variety.

Winnie the Pooh Released in 1,652

“Winnie the Pooh,” which was released in 1,652 theaters in February, earned $4.94 million (approximately 700 million yen) at the worldwide box office . The film’s plot revolves around the murderous Pooh and his best friend Piglet terrorizing college students and their former human companion Christopher Robin. On Rotten Tomatoes , the film received a 50% audience score and a 3% critic score. Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse were originally scheduled to enter the public domain in 1984, but the Copyright Act of 1976 extended the term of protection for all copyrights to 75 years, so Steamboat Willie ” copyright expired in 2004.

Winnie the Pooh  Released in 1,652

But then, in 1998, the U.S. Congress passed another law, later known as the Mickey Mouse Protection Act, extending the copyright term by another 20 years. For this reason, the 1995 rule is still in effect. Officially known as the 1998 Copyright Extension Act, this law is intended to protect companies such as Disney, the Motion Picture Association of America (now the Motion Picture Association), and the executor of George Gershwin’s estate . It was established through the efforts of people who wanted to protect their property. Steamboat Willie was released in 1928 and popularized Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse.

It was the world’s first animated work with synchronized video and audio, and was highly praised for its technological advances, becoming one of the most popular animations of its time. According to New York’s Museum of Modern Art , critics thought Mickey in Steamboat Willie was a combination of Charlie Chaplin, Douglas Fairbanks and Fred Astaire. One of the lawsuits that made Disney famous for its copyright lawsuits (though some say it’s an exaggeration) was brought against the Air Pirates, a group of cartoonists led by Dan O’Neill who published two cartoons featuring Mickey Mouse in the 1970s.

Winnie the Pooh  Released in 1,652

Disney, on the other hand, immediately started it . The comic parodied the original Mickey, depicting him in various situations including sex and drugs. After years of litigation, Disney won and O’Neal, now 81, agreed never to draw Mickey Mouse again. He told Variety last week that he could still be fined $190,000 if he painted Mickey Mouse.

For traditional characters like Sherlock Holmes, being in the public domain doesn’t protect you from all kinds of lawsuits. For example, Netflix was sued in 2020 by the executor of Arthur Conan Doyle’s estate over its portrayal of Holmes. At the time of the lawsuit, Holmes’ early works were in the public domain. Netflix’s 2020 film Enola Holmes portrayed Holmes as a warmer, more emotional person, different from the analytical genius he is known for, but Doyle’s estate argues that these character traits only appear in the final works. Those works were still under copyright protection at the time of the film’s release. However, these copyrights also expired in 2023, and the lawsuit was ultimately dismissed.

Must Read: THE MOVIE “MY SMALL LAND” DEPICTS THE STRUGGLES OF A KURDISH GIRL LIVING IN JAPAN, SET IN KAWAGUCHI CITY.

Leave a Reply